The impact of ObamaCare on doctors and patients, companies inside and outside the health sector, and American workers and taxpayers

Beginning in December of 2016, restaurants with more than 20 locations will be required to provide calorie information on their menus as part of the multi-stage Obamacare rule roll-out. While big chain restaurants and their large-scale suppliers like Coca-Cola or Budweiser will be able to follow this rule relatively easily, this could effectively ban craft beer from these establishments as smaller breweries struggle to comply.

A recent National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) study reveals that ObamaCare Marketplace plans are a bad deal, even for near-poor enrollees receiving large subsidies from the federal government. The study confirms that net premiums (after subsidies) were still several times what enrollees might have paid out-of-pocket for medical expenses had they remained uninsured.

The Obama administration and leading members of Congress are clashing over a new Medicare payment rule that could compromise patient care, impede development of a fledgling part of the biologics industry, and make it more difficult to track patient safety issues. At issue is government payment policy for a new class of drugs called “biosimilars”—drugs that are similar but not identical to the original brand name biologic drug.

Gallup’s latest poll shows the majority of Americans still oppose the ACA, even two years after its full implementation. Those who are uninsured oppose the health care law by nearly 30 points.

Proponents of more than doubling the current minimum wage of $7.25 appeared to have overlooked a simple fact. Thanks to government mandates such as Obamacare, today’s minimum wage already effectively amounts to $10.46 an hour. If we more than double the nominal minimum wage to $15, we actually will be requiring employers to pay $18.31 an hour.

This week on “The Journal Editorial Report” with Paul Gigot, columnist Kim Strassel talks about how ObamaCare helped the GOP pick up a governor’s seat in Kentucky as the law’s troubled co-ops continue to collapse.

Dr. Christina Bovelsky runs Peachtree Family Medicine in Middletown Delaware, and offers a unique approach to medicine. Rather than dealing with traditional insurance, co-pays and deductibles, Dr. Bovelsky’s patients pay a one-year membership fee. This fee includes between two and four office visits, an annual physical exam, and small procedures like electrocardiograms and strep tests.

Add 250 New York cancer patients to the long list of victims of ObamaCare’s lies — just one more snapshot of the program’s ongoing death spiral.

These New Yokers are getting treatment at world-renowned Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center — but their ObamaCare policies are about to vanish, as Health Republic, one of the largest health insurers on New York state’s exchange, and the only one to cover Sloan-Kettering treatment, is shutting down at month’s end after losing $130 million.

A local family that bought what they thought was a premium plan discovered they were going to have to pay thousands of dollars per year out of pocket for what other insurance plans would have covered.

In most states, consumers with HIV or AIDS who buy silver-level plans on the insurance marketplaces find limited coverage of common drug regimens they may need and high out-of-pocket costs, according to a new analysis.