The impact of ObamaCare on doctors and patients, companies inside and outside the health sector, and American workers and taxpayers

Opponents of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul are taking yet another challenge to the law to the Supreme Court, and say they will be back with more if this one fails. A new appeal being filed Monday by the Pacific Legal Foundation contends the law violates the provision of the Constitution that requires tax-raising bills to originate in the House of Representatives.

Obamacare’s health insurance exchanges open for business Nov. 1. Millions of Americans will soon have to log on to the digital state or federal marketplace to pick their plans for 2016. They’re in for a rude awakening. Obamacare is set to make insurance a lot more expensive next year. The law will increase its punishment for those who don’t obtain insurance. Many who do buy coverage on Obamacare’s exchanges will face premium hikes as high as 49 percent. Thousands of medium-size employers, meanwhile, will for the first time be subject to penalties if they do not offer coverage to their employees.

I can’t believe what I’ve been hearing recently from Obamacare defenders over the failing Obamacare co-ops–the most recent count has eight of them going bust. The biggest complaint seems to be that those mean Republicans forced these co-ops out of business because of a provision they included in the last budget.

What is the future of the Affordable Care Act co-ops? On Thursday, AEI’s Thomas P. Miller hosted a panel discussion on how the co-ops have fared so far and more particularly, why some prominent co-ops have failed.

Given how unpersuasive some Obamacare rulings have been, it’s easy to become cynical. But both sides have won and lost on some big issues. Thus, it is a mistake to think that there are five justices who will always vote to uphold Obamacare. The Origination Clause challenge to Obamacare that the Supreme Court is being asked to review today, Sissel v. HHS, presents some truly novel issues, as the debate among appellate judges this summer demonstrates. It also justifies a review of ten myths about Obamacare litigation.

HealthCare.gov, the federal ObamaCare exchange, has just released 2016 ObamaCare plans, and there’s little doubt about which insurer is the most aggressive on premiums to win customers. Centene (NYSE:CNC) will offer the cheapest bronze plan and the two cheapest silver plans in many of the big markets where its Ambetter Health plans compete, trumping Blue Cross, UnitedHealth Group (NYSE:UNH), Aetna (NYSE:AET) and Cigna (NYSE:CI).

Opponents of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul are taking yet another challenge to the law to the Supreme Court, and say they will be back with more if this one fails. A new appeal being filed Monday by the Pacific Legal Foundation contends the law violates the provision of the Constitution that requires tax-raising bills to originate in the House of Representatives.

They are the 10.5 million people eligible for Obamacare coverage who, two years since enrollment began, still haven’t signed up through the insurance marketplaces created for Obamacare. Experts agree that these will be the hardest people to convince to buy healthcare coverage. They’ve remained uninsured through two signup seasons, because they don’t believe they can afford it, don’t think they need it, or haven’t heard about it.

ObamaCare’s image of invincibility is increasingly being exposed as a political illusion, at least for those with permission to be honest about the evidence. Witness the heretofore unknown phenomenon of a “free” entitlement that its beneficiaries can’t afford or don’t want.

Tens of thousands of people with modest incomes are at risk of losing health insurance subsidies in January because they did not file income tax returns, federal officials and consumer advocates say. Under federal rules, anyone who receives an insurance subsidy must file a tax return to verify that the person was eligible and received the proper amount of financial assistance based on household income.