The most recent public polling on topics such as the popularity of the healthcare law, its impact on the medical profession, health costs, and more.

Despite the ongoing debate between Republican lawmakers and President Obama on the future of the 2010 health care law, the January Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds the Affordable Care Act is only one of many issues that may impact voting decisions, with nearly a quarter (23%) saying it’s extremely important.

When asked specifically about how some health care issues may impact their vote for president, at this point in the campaign, there’s not a single health care issue that voters coalesce around with more than 4 in 10 saying a number of different health care issues may be important to their vote.

Most uninsured Americans are sitting on the sidelines as sign-up season under the federal health law comes to a close, according to a new poll that signals the nation’s historic gains in coverage are slowing. The survey released Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation finds that:

– Only 15% of the uninsured know this year’s open enrollment deadline, which is Sunday.

– More than 7 in 10 say they have not tried to figure out if they qualify for the two main coverage expansions in the law, Medicaid and subsidized private health insurance.

– Only 1 in 100 know the minimum penalty for being uninsured is going up to $695 in 2016.

Six out of 10 registered voters support “low income subsidies for health insurance.”

A smaller proportion (45%) believe states should expand Medicaid to people who work but are too poor to buy insurance.

Even fewer voters (41%) approve of President Obama’s idea to extend “start-up” benefits to states that haven’t yet expanded Medicaid.

This Kaiser Family Foundation/New York Times survey provides an in-depth look at the experiences of Americans ages 18-64 who say they or someone in their household had problems paying medical bills in the past year. The survey explores the causes of medical bill problems and the impacts they have on individuals and their families, finances, and access to health care. To provide context, a shorter companion survey was conducted among those who do not report having medical bill problems.

Americans want to know what the next U.S. president will do to lower their rising health care costs, a priority shared by Republican and Democratic voters and second only to keeping the country safe. In all, 62% of people surveyed said they would want to know about a presidential candidate’s plan for reducing health care costs.

Only 7% of the uninsured correctly identify this as the deadline to enroll in coverage and 20% say they have been contacted by someone about signing up for coverage. When asked why they have not purchased health insurance this year, nearly half of the uninsured (46%) say they have tried to get coverage but that it was too expensive.

A narrow majority of physicians say Obamacare has a negative impact on medical practice, including on the quality and cost of health care, according to a report from the Journal of the American Medical Association. The report found that 52 percent of physicians look on Obamacare as unfavorable to the general medical situation, while 48 percent say it is favorable.

Polling highlights:

  • 31% have delayed medical care because of cost, unchanged from 2014
  • Figure has not fallen since ACA reforms
  • Americans more likely to put off care for serious condition

While views of the health care law have been narrowly divided for much of the year, this month, more say they have an unfavorable view of the law than a favorable one (45 percent versus 38 percent, a statistically significant difference).

  • 53% of Americans rate healthcare quality in U.S. positively
  • One in three rate U.S. healthcare coverage positively
  • Fewer than one in four satisfied with cost of healthcare