A project of the Galen Institute

Commentary

Jennifer Haberkorn
Politico
Tue, 2014-09-30
"The second Obamacare enrollment season could go negative — but not because of the health care law’s critics. Obama administration allies are weighing a focus on the loathsome individual mandate and the penalties that millions of Americans could face if they don’t get covered. It would be a calculated approach to prompt sign-ups, a task that the law’s supporters expect to be more difficult, or at least more complex, than in its coverage’s inaugural year. There are several challenges: The 2015 enrollment period is shorter, the most motivated Americans are probably already enrolled and the law is still politically unpopular. That means that even if HealthCare.gov works well — and it couldn’t be worse than last October’s meltdown — proponents are confronting a tough messaging landscape."
Lanhee Chen
Bloomberg
Tue, 2014-09-30
"As we start the final stretch before the midterm elections, many analysts are convinced that Obamacare isn't the hot political issue it once was. While the flood of negative publicity about the law has subsided of late, a majority of people still oppose it, according to a Real Clear Politics average of polls taken from Sept. 2-15. And I’ve always believed the voters’ negative impressions of the law were “baked” into their assessments of Democratic incumbents. That’s partly why Democratic Senators such as Kay Hagan of North Carolina, Mark Pryor of Arkansas and Mark Begich of Alaska find themselves barely breaking 40 percent in recent public polls. But a new study out this week from Bloomberg Government threatens to bring the Affordable Care Act back to center stage -- and in a way that will likely hurt the electoral chances of incumbent Democrats, all of whom voted for the law."
Melinda Deslatte
Associated Press
Tue, 2014-09-30
"Gov. Bobby Jindal has been viewed as a health care policy wonk, and he’s tried to build on that image ahead of a likely 2016 presidential campaign, positioning himself as the candidate with substantive ideas. But his administration’s handling of health care matters at home could undermine his bonafides in the subject area and threaten his efforts to sell himself as a health care expert."
Alison Bruzek
NPR
Tue, 2014-09-30
"You wake up feeling gross – stuffy and full of aches. A quick Google search of your symptoms confirms that yes, you probably have a cold and not the plague. But what if you were directed to a site that had a legitimate sounding name but wasn't really accurate at all? It sounds like a problem from the ancient days of the Internet. Since then people have learned that .gov leads to bona fide government sites, but .com could be anyone selling you anything. How do you feel about .health? A new slew of web domains is coming down the pike, like ".health," ".doctor," and ".clinic." They're not required to have any medical credentials. That's deeply worrying to some public health advocates."
Connie Cass
The Associated Press
Tue, 2014-09-30
"Confused by President Barack Obama's health care law? How about the debate over government surveillance? The way the Federal Reserve affects interest rates? You're far from alone. Most people in the United States say the issues facing the country are getting harder to fathom. It's not just those tuning out politics who feel perplexed. People who vote regularly, follow news about November's election or simply feel a civic duty to stay informed are most likely to say that issues have become "much more complicated" over the past decade, an Associated Press-GfK poll shows."
Jim Angle
Fox News
Tue, 2014-09-30
"After the rocky rollout last fall of the ObamaCare website, the administration wants to re-enroll those already in the system in hopes of avoiding another technological embarrassment. But analysts warn that just blindly re-enrolling could mean trouble for consumers. “This notion of just sit back and re-enroll is really misleading and I think could cause a lot of harm to people," said Bob Laszewski of Health Policy and Strategy Associates. “The automatic renewal, it's easy, it will keep people getting ObamaCare," added Rosemary Gibson of the Hastings Center. "But you have to trust but verify. You have to go look. You just can't be on automatic pilot for health insurance.""
Daniela Hernandez
Kaiser Health News
Tue, 2014-09-30
"When Fabrizio Mancinelli applied for health insurance through California’s online marketplace nine months ago, he ran into a frustrating snag. An Italian composer and self-described computer geek, Mancinelli said he was surprised to find there wasn’t a clear way to upload a copy of his O-1 visa. The document, which grants temporary residency status to people with extraordinary talents in the sciences and arts, was part of his proof to the government to that he was eligible for coverage. So, the 35 year-old Sherman Oaks resident wrote in his application that he’d be happy to send along any further documentation. Months went by without word from the state. Then last week he came home from vacation to find a notice telling him he was at risk of losing the Anthem Blue Cross plan he’d purchased."
Sat, 2014-09-27
"The Affordable Care Act changed the rules on how health insurance plans dealt with pre-existing conditions, outlawing the practice of turning away patients with expensive conditions or charging them a drastically higher cost for coverage. But an editorial alleges some health insurance companies operating on the new marketplaces created by Obamacare may have found a loophole that allows them to discourage sick patients from enrolling in a specific plan. The change has to do with how drugs are categorized in health systems. From the editorial published online at the American Journal of Managed Care: "For many years, most insurers had formularies that consisted of only three tiers: Tier 1 was for generic drugs (lowest copay), Tier 2 was for branded drugs that were designated “preferred” (higher co- pay), and Tier 3 was for “nonpreferred” branded drugs (highest copay).
Sarah Hurtubise
Daily Caller
Sat, 2014-09-27
"After a long list of Obamacare failures in Alaska, one physician is shutting down his decades-old practice, charging that the health-care law and other federal programs are “unsustainable” for practicing doctors. Dr. William Wennen, a plastic surgeon, is closing his Fairbanks practice after 38 years of working in the state. Dr. Wennen blames federal health insurance programs, citing Obamacare, Medicaid and Medicare, for shutting down his practice."
Andrew Branch
World News
Fri, 2014-09-26
"A survey of American physicians released this week paints a restless picture of the nation’s doctors—especially when it comes to Obamacare. “The system is broken and I am out of here as soon as I can,” one doctor wrote. “I am tired of being used, abused, and lied to. Has anyone here woken up to the fact that we are always the last ones to be considered in the equation of change?” Roughly 20,000 of 650,000 doctors responded to the Physicians Foundation’s survey, and voluntary surveys are prone to finding those with strong opinions. But of those strong opinions, 46 percent of doctors gave the Affordable Care Act (ACA) a “D” or “F,” while only 25 percent gave it an “A” or “B.”"

ObamaCare Watch Weekly

* indicates required

View previous campaigns.

Check out Jim Capretta's new book.

ObamaCare Primer