A project of the Galen Institute

Commentary

Bob Laszewski
HealthCare Policy and Marketplace Review
Fri, 2014-10-10
"With the second Obamacare open-enrollment beginning on November 15th, the enrollment system's testing begins with insurance companies this week. Of course, last year the enrollment system testing was a real mess resulting in a humiliating Obamacare launch for the administration. Up until now I wasn't expecting any major problems with HealthCare.gov's consumer enrollment system given all of the lessons learned and the new people running things. But apparently, the administration is pretty worried about what could happen."
Rachel Bade
Politico
Fri, 2014-10-10
"There are dozens of ways to escape Obamacare’s individual mandate tax — but good luck figuring that out come tax season. Tens of millions of Americans can avoid the fee if they qualify for exemptions like hardship or living in poverty, but the convoluted process has some experts worried individuals will be tripped up by lost paperwork, the need to verify information with multiple sources and long delays that extend beyond tax season. “It’s not going to be pretty,” said George Brandes, vice president of health care programs at Jackson Hewitt, a tax prep firm. “Just because you theoretically qualify for hardship, or another exemption, doesn’t mean you’re going to get it.”"
Investors.com
Fri, 2014-10-10
"Health Reform: Wal-Mart says it's cutting health benefits to part-timers and boosting worker premiums. If a retail empire built on low prices can't find a way around ObamaCare's added costs, we are all doomed. The world's biggest retailer announced this week that its health costs will be about 48% higher for the current fiscal year than it had expected in February. As a result, it's cutting 30,000 part-timers from its health benefit plan, raising worker-paid premiums by 19% and trimming its co-payment for health costs above the deductible. "We had to make some tough decisions," benefits director Sally Wellborn told the Associated Press. But to hear President Obama tell it, Wal-Mart just didn't shop around. That, at least, was what he said when the general manager of the Indiana-based Millennium Steel asked Obama last week about the company's double-digit premium hikes. Obama's response: "The question is whether you guys are shopping effectively enough.""
Drew Altman, Kaiser Family Foundation
Wall Street Journal
Thu, 2014-10-09
"If the Congressional Budget Office is close to the mark, in the second open-enrollment season we will see about a doubling of the 7 million people enrolled in the Affordable Care Act insurance marketplaces. Open enrollment, which begins Nov. 15, is three months this year, or half as long as last year, and the remaining eligible uninsured are a more difficult-to-reach population. Here are the biggest challenges this time around: First, the overwhelming reason the remaining uninsured cite as to why they have not already gotten coverage is that they believe they could not afford it. The message that most needs to reach the uninsured is that there are tax credits available to help make coverage more affordable. For a 30-year-old making $25,000 per year, the ACA tax credit would reduce the average cost of the most commonly selected “silver plan” from $2,877 per year to $1,729.
Marissa Evans
Morning Consult
Wed, 2014-10-08
"Consumers keep price top of mind when they purchase prescription drugs and they’re unafraid to buy against the big labels, a new Morning Consult poll found. Nearly three quarters of respondents said if given the choice between a brand name drug and a generic version, they’d be more willing to choose the generic version. What’s more, 65 percent of respondents disagreed that brand name drugs were more effective than generic drugs."
Sarah Kliff
Vox
Wed, 2014-10-08
"There are obvious benefits to getting health insurance at work. For one, employer-sponsored insurance is not taxed, meaning that every dollar of compensation provided as medical coverage stretches further. Individual market plans, meanwhile, are purchased with post-tax dollars. The only way to get in on the tax exemption is to buy coverage at work. But for low-wage workers, Obamacare  has introduced a new and big drawback to the employer insurance. Namely, anybody who gets access to affordable coverage at work is barred from getting subsidies through the new exchanges. This is even true for people who don't buy insurance at work; just the act of getting offered employer coverage blocks individuals from using getting financial help."
Guy Benson
townhall.com
Wed, 2014-10-08
"President Obama and some of his most ardent media acolytes are insistent. No matter what you may have heard, Obamacare 'is working' in the 'real world.' That's the new mantra. Learn it, love it, etc. The Lean Forward network, unsurprisingly, has served as the vanguard of this propaganda push. Their working theory seems to be that if you repeat an assertion often enough to the same tiny audience, you can wish-cast your dreams into reality:"
Kaiser Family Foundation
Wed, 2014-10-08
"In 2010, many political analysts and journalists cited the debate over, and enactment of, the Affordable Care Act (often called “Obamacare”) as one factor that helped spark the conservative Tea Party movement and the Republican takeover of the House in that year’s Midterm Elections. Four years later, the law’s major coverage provisions have taken effect, resulting in new health coverage for millions of Americans, but public opinion on the law remains deeply divided along partisan lines, with more viewing it negatively than positively."
Grace-Marie Turner, Galen Institute
Forbes
Wed, 2014-10-08
"If Washington is ever going to tackle entitlement reform and get federal spending under control, it must start with Medicare. The former director of the Congressional Budget Office, Doug Holtz-Eakin, details Medicare’s fiscal plight: Between 2001 and 2010, Medicare’s cumulative cash flow deficits totaled more than $1.5 trillion – or 28% of the total federal debt over the past decade. But it gets worse: By 2020, as Baby Boomers continue to age into Medicare at the rate of more than 10,000 a day, Medicare’s cumulative $6.2 trillion in cash flow deficits will constitute 35% of the nation’s total debt accumulation."
Gail Buckner
Fox Business
Tue, 2014-10-07
"This time last year there seemed to be a new catastrophe or scandal every day related to the roll-out of the Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. ObamaCare: many predicted the federal website would never be up and running by the looming deadline, the cost kept escalating, private contractors publically blamed bumbling bureaucrats and vice versa. Meanwhile, individuals who attempted to sign up ran into technical problems, and there were horror stories about people being told they would be dropped by their current insurance provider despite the fact the president had assured them this would not happen. Confusion was everywhere. Ultimately, key players got fired or resigned in disgrace. So, where do we stand today, one year later? That’s what the non-profit Transamerica Center for Health Studies (TCHS) wanted to know."

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