You won’t hear this from the establishment media but the Senate’s ObamaCare repeal bill contains massive tax relief for middle class families. When it was signed into law seven years ago, ObamaCare implemented a health care system with top-down, bureaucratic command and control. The government told you what insurance you must have. And what you…

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But the core planks of the Senate Republicans’ health bill — the Better Care Reconciliation Act — borrow just as much from Democratic ideas as Obamacare borrowed from Republican ones. The Senate bill’s plan to reform Medicaid by tying per-enrollee spending to medical inflation through 2025 and to consumer inflation thereafter was borrowed from a nearly…

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Since Senate Republicans released their healthcare reform bill early Thursday, the narrative from the media has been that this bill is a giant tax cut for “the rich.” This narrative is false. ObamaCare imposed a long list of taxes that directly hit middle class families. The Senate’s “Better Care Reconciliation Act” (BCRA) repeals these taxes and…

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Experts don’t always agree, but eight of us (including Grace-Marie Turner) from right and left found common ground on key health reform recommendations.  We agreed that states should be given greater authority to configure and redirect revenue streams from Medicaid, CHIP and private insurance; that the existing tax exclusion for employer-sponsored health benefits should have…

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The Congressional Budget Office says 15 million people will lose medical coverage next year if the Senate GOP’s health-care bill becomes law. That’s not quite accurate. CBO doesn’t believe that millions will “lose” their insurance in 2018. Instead, the agency thinks that millions will happily cancel their coverage—even those who get it for free. The…

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On Monday the Congressional Budget Office released its cost estimate of the Republican Senate Better Care Reconciliation Act.  CBO calculated that the proposed bill would reduce the deficit by $321 billion over the next decade. That is welcome news. Less welcome, however, was CBO’s conclusion that the Senate bill would result in an additional 15 million uninsured…

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The Senate Republican health-care bill would not repeal and replace Obamacare. The federal government would remain the chief regulator of health insurance. No state would be allowed to experiment with different models for protecting people with pre-existing conditions. Federal policy would continue to push people away from inexpensive catastrophic coverage. The bill also seems unlikely…

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The Senate health-care legislative draft — officially titled the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 — will, if passed, represent the greatest policy achievement by a Republican Congress in generations. For decades, free-market health-reform advocates have argued that the single best idea for improving U.S. health care is to maximize the number of Americans who…

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The Senate proposal wouldn’t cut Medicaid spending in real dollars — spending would continue to grow — but it would slow the rate of spending for the program, phase out extra money the federal government has given to states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare) and leave states to…

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Health insurance cannot really be insurance because human health is un-insurable: human beings are not machines or buildings whose function or condition can be ascertained objectively. Yet, an objective assessment of damages and costs is essential for any contractual arrangement to function in a sustainable manner. Consider, for example, that medical care is based on…

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