A project of the Galen Institute
Patrick Marshall, Seattle Times
Sat, 2014-09-06
"According to figures released today by the Washington Health Benefit Exchange, 24,072 people have been dropped from coverage through the Healthplanfinder insurance exchange since those plans took effect in January 2014. Of that number, 8,310 were disenrolled because of non-payment of premiums, 7,735 voluntarily ended their coverage, and 8,027 were determined to no longer be eligible for a qualified health plan. Most of those determined to be no longer eligible were qualified instead for Medicaid. The exchange also said 11,497 individuals have gained coverage through the exchange since the open enrollment period ended on March 31. These additions largely involved provisions allowing enrollment after a qualifying life event, such as a moving to a new state or changes in family size."
Paul Demko and Bob Herman, Modern Healthcare
Thu, 2014-09-04
"The District of Columbia U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington on Thursday said the full 11-member court will rehear (PDF) the controversial case that ruled Americans could not receive subsidies to help pay for plans on federally run health insurance exchanges. Oral arguments will begin Dec. 17. The court's decision to rehear the case en banc, which experts said is rare for the D.C. appellate court, vacates the judgment issued earlier this summer. On July 22, a three-judge panel ruled 2-1 in Halbig v. Burwell that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act forbade people with lower incomes from receiving tax subsidies from insurance marketplaces run by the federal government, effectively making those subsidies illegal in 36 states. Opponents of the Affordable Care Act greeted the D.C. court's initial ruling with praise, saying the judges upheld the text of the law.
Samantha Liss, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Thu, 2014-09-04
"Enrolling in Missouri’s Medicaid program has not been easy. Many applicants have experienced a barrage of problems when trying to sign up for the program, including long delays until coverage kicks in, lost paperwork and a lack of one-on-one interaction with caseworkers. State officials have blamed a new computer system used to process Medicaid applications. But there is another reason why some Missourians struggle to get help. When Deborah Weaver, 28, had issues enrolling in the state’s Medicaid coverage for pregnant women, a switch from her Medicaid disability coverage, she was directed to use a toll-free number, 1-855-373-4636.
Jenn Harris, L.A. Times
Thu, 2014-09-04
"Josiah Citrin's Melisse and Suzanne Goin's Lucques, The Larder restaurants, Tavern and the new AOC are just the latest in a group of Los Angeles restaurants implementing a 3% employee benefit surcharge to all guest checks.. Goin, along with Citrin and Rustic Canyon's Josh Loeb and Zoe Nathan all made the announcement to add the surcharge in recent newsletters to customers. The surcharge started showing up on guest checks Monday. "To us, when we rolled it out, we thought people would want to support places that are supporting their staff," Loeb told The Times. "I would do that. If I knew a place was supporting their staff, I'd want to go there." According to Loeb, the decision to add a surcharge rather than increase menu prices was twofold. "We wanted to have our menu prices be an accurate reflection of ingredient costs, and we also wanted give customers a little bit of control and power," said Loeb.
Anne Zieger, Healthcare Dive
Thu, 2014-09-04
"Dive Brief: •In an effort to reduce the backlog of contested Medicare claims, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has offered to pay hospitals 68% of what they say they are owed for short-term inpatient stays. •The system of hearings on challenged claims has been on hold since December, when the HHS Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals temporarily suspended most new requests for administrative law judge hearings on payment denials by recovery audit contractors. •Hospitals will have 60 days to decide whether to accept CMS' offer, which does not apply to any short-term hospital admission that occurred after October 1, 2013."
Joseph Conn, Modern Healthcare
Thu, 2014-09-04
"In 2002, in a modification of the primary healthcare information privacy rule under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, HHS removed patient consent as a requirement for the release and disclosure of patient information for most common uses. In so doing, HHS gave a regulatory green light to electronic health data disclosures. Twelve years later, it looks as if Apple is laying down a big bet in the opposite direction by placing consent-management restrictions on developers who plan to use its HealthKit mobile application platform, which is expected to be part of its new operating system to be released later this month, according to published reports. According to the Guardian, which quotes as its primary source an article in the Financial Times, Apple has informed developers that they “'must not sell an end-user's health information collected through the HealthKit APIs to advertising platforms, data brokers or information resellers.”"
Martha Bebinger, WBUE
Wed, 2014-09-03
"Two years ago, Massachusetts set what was considered an ambitious goal: The state would not let that persistent monster, rising health care costs, increase faster than the economy as a whole. Today, the results of the first full year are out and there’s reason to for many to celebrate. The number that will go down in the history books is 2.3 percent. It’s well below a state-imposed benchmark for health care cost growth of 3.6 percent, and well below the increases seen for at least a decade. “So all of that’s really good news,” says Aron Boros, executive director at the Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA), which is releasing the first calculation of state health care expenditures. “It really seems like…the growth in health care spending is slowing.” Why?
Mary Agnes Carey, Kaiser Health News
Wed, 2014-09-03
"Reduced costs for medical services and labor have trimmed the 10-year projected cost of Medicare and Medicaid by $89 billion, the Congressional Budget Office said Wednesday. Medicare spending is projected to drop by $49 billion — or less than 1 percent — from 2015 and 2024, while Medicaid spending is expected to drop by $40 billion — or about 1 percent — over the next decade, CBO said in an update to its April forecast. Despite the long-term projected drop, federal spending for major health care programs will jump this year by $67 billion — or about 9 percent — the agency estimated. The largest increase will be for Medicaid, which is projected to grow by $40 billion, or 15 percent. Most of this short-term increase is attributable to the Affordable Care Act, including its Medicaid expansion and the financial assistance to help people purchase health insurance."
Lisa Riley Roche, Deseret News
Wed, 2014-09-03
"Utah Gov. Gary Herbert isn't backing down from insisting on a work requirement in his Healthy Utah alternative to Medicaid expansion, even though Pennsylvania's governor dropped the same mandate to win federal approval. "We're always keeping an eye on what's happening in other states that are in a similar situation. That said, we're not always reactive," Herbert spokesman Marty Carpenter said Tuesday. "It's still a very important element of the deal to the governor." Last week, the Obama administration announced it had signed off on Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett's plan to use the money available under the Affordable Care Act to provide health care coverage to low-income uninsured residents. Corbett's Healthy PA plan is close to what fellow Republican Herbert has proposed, except that the Pennsylvania governor dropped a requirement that able-bodied recipients look for a job."
Saerom Yoo, Salem Statesman-Journal
Wed, 2014-09-03
"The disputes between Oracle and Oregon are forcing the state to grow more dependent on the federal government to manage health insurance sign-ups. "We needed some extra services from Oracle in order to do some additional development on the Medicaid side, but they declined to offer any service beyond their current contract," transition project director Tina Edlund said Tuesday. "We moved those services over to the state data center." Edlund's team is working to move the state health exchange to the federal healthcare.gov, and also move the Medicaid eligibility determination function to the Oregon Health Authority, both jobs Cover Oregon was supposed to handle. Oracle and Oregon are suing each other in state and federal courts, seeking to blame the other for the failure of those projects."

ObamaCare Watch Weekly

* indicates required

View previous campaigns.

Check out Jim Capretta's new book.

ObamaCare Primer