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The Des Moines Register
06/27/15
Obamacare is dead. Long live Robertscare. With Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision in King v. Burwell, Chief Justice John Roberts, writing for the majority, cemented the Affordable Care Act as the law of the land. Oh, there will still be plenty of legal challenges to it, and there will be an attempt to replace it should a Republican occupy 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. in 2017; but for all intents and purposes, the individual and employer mandates, and now the subsidized federal health insurance exchange, are now in concrete.
Forbes
06/26/15
Yesterday, the Supreme Court sided with the Obama administration in the King v. Burwell Obamacare case. In a statement after the decision, President Obama declared that his signature health law is “here to stay.” But in his remarks, the President knowingly ignored the key concept in the case: that if the challengers had won, not one word of the law called the “Affordable Care Act” would have been changed. On the other hand, if voters elect a Republican President and a Republican Congress in 2016, quite a bit will change.
Politico
06/26/15
Obamacare has cleared a second major hurdle at the Supreme Court — but its troubles are far from over. The law is still highly unpopular, and significant structural issues remain: Health insurance rates are rising, many people don’t have as much choice of doctors and hospitals as they’d like, some states continue to struggle with their exchanges, and 21 states still haven’t backed Medicaid expansion.
The New York Times
06/26/15
Now that the Supreme Court has ruled that health insurance consumers can receive federal subsidies regardless of their state’s role in running their insurance market, fewer states may stay in the game.
Market Watch
06/26/15
Thursday’s Supreme Court decision (King v. Burwell) allows Obamacare premium tax credits (subsidies) in states that do not run their own health insurance exchanges. The decision pretty much guarantees that all the Obamacare tax increases will be with us through at least 2016 — and probably forever.
Economics 21
06/26/15
Here are six proposals for Congress as it begins the work of ending the disaster that is the Affordable Care Act and crafting a law that will benefit Americans and increase economic growth.
The Wall Street Journal
06/26/15
The Supreme Court’s ruling Thursday in King v. Burwell has temporarily saved the Affordable Care Act, but millions of Americans are still hurting under ObamaCare. The high court’s six-justice majority agreed that the IRS can change the wording of the law to the administration’s liking. No one, however, can change that ObamaCare is an expensive failure—unpopular, unworkable and unaffordable.
The Wall Street Journal
06/26/15
Many opponents of the health law are putting away their legal wrecking balls and reaching for chisels. Thomas Miller, one of the strategists behind the Supreme Court case that aimed to strike down subsidies on the federal exchange, said he thought he would be celebrating now. But after Thursday’s decision upholding the subsidies, he is setting up meetings to discuss narrower attacks on the Affordable Care Act.
The American Enterprise Institute
06/26/15
Before we hold a going-out-of-business sale for the rule of law, following Thursday’s King v. Burwell ruling at the Supreme Court, let’s review some between-the-lines highlights. The Scalia dissent already took care of the fundamental analysis of how the Court veered so far off course.
American Enterprise Institute
06/25/15
Now, it’s time for Obamacare opponents and partial critics to move on to the next play. That’s in the political, not the judicial, arena. Elections, and following though on campaign promises, matter. The law and its regulatory mutations still don’t and won’t work well. More disappointments in what the ACA exchanges produce are ahead, and the reach of the law’s many contradictory and ill-founded ambitions has already reached a high-water mark. Returning our health care system back to a better place will take more time and incremental effort. But it still can and will happen. The old-fashioned way. First by containing the scope and scale of future harm. And then by peeling back the worst parts of this law through legislative and (future) executive branch means, piece by piece.

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