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Issue: "Taxes"

Three Conservative Ideas Buried Within Obamacare

Greg Scandlen, The Federalist
Tue, 2014-07-15
"The Affordable Care Act is the worst piece of legislation ever passed into law in the United States. It was poorly conceived, poorly written, poorly enacted, and is being poorly implemented. The thing is a mess. However, it does open up some doors that were firmly locked before—things that most free-market economists have been espousing for years without success. We should not run away from those things just because they have President Obama’s name on it. I am not talking about the things the idiot media think are popular—the slacker mandate, open enrollment, equal premiums for men and women, and free “preventative” services. These are all terrible ideas for reasons I won’t go into here (unless you insist). I’m talking specifically about several more important elements of the law that were not well crafted in this particular bill, but can now be used as precedents for major improvements in American health care."

Bosses bash Affordable Care Act: report

Gregory Bresiger, NY Post
Thu, 2014-07-10
"ObamaCare hurts businesses. That’s the result of an exhaustive study polling small to medium-sized businesses. The controversial government health-care reform increases company and employee costs and sometimes stops companies from hiring as well, participants told the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans in its new study. “More than half of single employers believe the Affordable Care Act has had a negative effect on their company,” according to the report. The survey, which polled some employers and their health-care pros, found that the majority of respondents, 54 percent, thought the effect of the ACA on their firms had been “negative” or “very negative.” The same respondents also expected that the negative effects from ACA would increase to 66 percent in the near future as the program unfolds."

Colorado health insurance exchange asks for carrier fee, sets budget

Electa Draper, The Denver Post
Mon, 2014-06-09
"The board of Connect for Health Colorado will consider Monday whether to begin charging insurance carriers $1.25 a month for each policy on their books to generate more than $13 million for the state health exchange."

The Shrinking Obamacare Individual Mandate

Steven Dennis, Roll Call
Fri, 2014-06-06
"It’s the tax at the heart of Obamacare, but just more than 1 percent of Americans will end up paying it, according to an analysis by the Congressional Budget Office. The CBO and the Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) slashed their estimates for how many people will pay the individual mandate tax penalty in 2016 by a third — to 4 million from 6 million — citing exemptions granted by the Obama administration, including exemptions for people whose plans were cancelled because they did not meet the Affordable Care Act’s requirements."

Exchange board frustration mounts over spending

Katie Kerwin McCrimmon, Health News Colorado
Fri, 2014-06-06
"Colorado’s exchange managers have triggered confusion among their own finance committee board members on the eve of a critical vote Monday over future spending and revenues. Health News Colorado on Thursday reported that board members were concerned that exchange managers had spent $10 million over the past year to sign up about 8,000 people through face-to-face enrollment centers."

CBO: Millions will dodge ObamaCare fines

Elise Viebeck, The Hill
Thu, 2014-06-05
"Congressional budget scorekeepers estimated Thursday that only a fraction of the people without health insurance in 2016 will actually pay a penalty under ObamaCare's individual mandate. In a new analysis, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) said only 4 million of the 30 million who are expected to be uninsured in 2016 will pay a fine."

Exchange spent $10 million for 8,000 face-to-face sign-ups

Katie Kerwin McCrimmon, Health News Colorado
Thu, 2014-06-05
"Colorado health exchange managers spent $10 million over the past year on a statewide assistance network that generated about 8,000 sign-ups for private health insurance. Board critics pressed managers on the wisdom and sustainability of spending about $1,250 per customer for the face-to-face help centers."

Fiscal Diagnosis Only Gets Tougher for Health Care Law

Paul M. Krawzak, Roll Call
Wed, 2014-06-04
"For Democratic lawmakers who were hesitant to sign onto the sweeping 2010 health care law, one of the most powerful selling points was that the Affordable Care Act would actually reduce the federal budget deficit, despite the additional costs of extending health insurance coverage to the uninsured. Four years after enactment of what is widely viewed as President Barack Obama’s key legislative achievement, however, it’s unclear whether the health care law is still on track to reduce the deficit or whether it may actually end up adding to the federal debt. In fact, the answer to that question has become something of a mystery."

GOP wants names of HHS officials involved in botched state exchanges

Elise Viebeck, The Hill
Tue, 2014-06-03
"House Republicans are pushing the Obama administration to release the names of federal officials involved in awarding grants to troubled health insurance exchanges around the country. The letter from Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-Mich.) furthers the GOP's effort to investigate and criticize failed exchanges at the state level, including Cover Oregon and Maryland Health Connection. Upton and several colleagues accused the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) of spending $1.3 billion on seven marketplaces where serious problems persist."

Five States' Health-Care Exchanges See Costly Fixes

Stephanie Armour, Wall Street Journal
Tue, 2014-06-03
"Five states that launched health exchanges under the Affordable Care Act expect to spend as much as $240 million to fix their sites or switch to the federal marketplace, a Wall Street Journal analysis shows."

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