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Emily Wagster Pettus, Associated Press
Wed, 2014-10-08
"JACKSON, Miss. Groups supporting low-income Mississippi residents said Tuesday that elected officials are ignoring 300,000 people and refusing billions of federal dollars by choosing not to expand Medicaid in one of the poorest states in the nation. If the state were to extend Medicaid, as allowed under the health overhaul that President Barack Obama signed into law, many low-wage workers could receive coverage that would enable them to afford doctors' visits, prescriptions and medical supplies, said Roy Mitchell of the Mississippi Health Advocacy Program. He said bus drivers, cashiers, day care workers and many others are in jobs that provide modest paychecks but no health insurance coverage."
Alex Nixon, Pittsburgh Tribune Media
Wed, 2014-10-08
"Some health insurers are having trouble finding doctors and hospitals to accept low rates under Gov. Tom Corbett's Medicaid expansion plan, leading one company to quit the program and another to reduce participation. Highmark Inc., the state's largest health insurer, said it won't participate in Corbett's Healthy PA program because it couldn't sign enough doctors to its network. Healthy PA is an alternative to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, proposed by Corbett and approved by the federal government in August, in which private insurers provide coverage to Medicaid recipients."
Michelle Stein, Inside Health Policy
Tue, 2014-10-07
"CMS on Tuesday (Oct. 7) reopened the period to request hardship exemptions from so-called meaningful use requirements for electronic health records, giving some doctors and hospitals another opportunity to avoid penalties in 2015. The move follows stakeholders' calls earlier this year for more time to submit hardship requests and lawmakers' requests that some providers attesting to meaningful use for the first time in 2014 be allowed to avoid penalties in 2015. CMS told Inside Health Policy that there are still some issues surrounding availability and implementation of the 2014 certified EHRs, and the agency wanted to make sure that providers aren't penalized because of those problems."
Kate Scanlon, Daily Signal
Tue, 2014-10-07
"Meal, drink, tip … insurance? Some Los Angeles restaurants are adding a 3 percent surcharge to diners’ tabs in order to cover employees’ health insurance. The owners of the restaurants deny that the additional charge is a “political statement” about the Affordable Care Act, saying it’s merely a way to provide for their employees. “We want our staff to have health care,” Josh Loeb, a co-owner of the restaurant Milo & Olive told the Los Angeles Times. “It’s not because we support Obama or don’t support Obama, or are Democrats or are not Democrats.”"
Phil Galewitz, Kaiser Health News
Mon, 2014-10-06
"When Congress passed the Affordable Care Act, it required health insurers, hospitals, device makers and pharmaceutical companies to share in the cost because they would get a windfall of new, paying customers. But with an $8 billion tax on insurers due Sept. 30 — the first time the new tax is being collected — the industry is getting help from an unlikely source: taxpayers. States and the federal government will spend at least $700 million this year to pay the tax for their Medicaid health plans. The three dozen states that use Medicaid managed care plans will give those insurers more money to cover the new expense. Many of those states – such as Florida, Louisiana and Tennessee – did not expand Medicaid as the law allows, and in the process turned down billions in new federal dollars."
Eric Bradner, CNN
Mon, 2014-10-06
"As soon as Air Force One touched down in Indiana on Friday, Gov. Mike Pence met President Barack Obama on the tarmac with a plea: Expand the state's access to government-sponsored health insurance. The catch: Pence wants to do it with a conservative twist. At least, that's how he's selling his proposal. And his political future could hinge on whether the first-term Republican can convince conservatives that he's not just rebranding Obamacare. Pence has spent much of his first two years in office trying to strike a bargain on one of the health care law's core components. Indiana will expand Medicaid coverage, Pence says, but only if it's allowed to do it through a tweaked version called the "Healthy Indiana Plan," which also requires users to make small payments into health savings accounts."
Judy Lin, Associated Press
Mon, 2014-10-06
"Proposition 45 offers a simple choice for voters: Do they want the state insurance commissioner to regulate health care rates for small businesses and individual health plans? The campaign fight over whether that would be beneficial for consumers is much more complicated. Initiative proponents, led by Democratic Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones and Consumer Watchdog, a Santa Monica-based consumer group with backing from attorneys, say the initiative would add transparency to the rate-setting process."
Vicki Needham, The Hill
Mon, 2014-10-06
"Medicare is fining a record number of hospitals because they readmitted too many patients within 30 days for more treatment, according to federal records released this week. During the next year, 2,610 hospitals will see their reimbursement levels reduced and 39 hospitals will be hit with the largest penalty allowed, according to Kaiser Health News. The federal government’s penalties are designed to make hospitals pay more attention to their patients after they are discharged."
Sam Hananel, Associated Press
Fri, 2014-10-03
"The Supreme Court said Thursday it will decide whether private sector health care providers can force a state to raise its Medicaid reimbursement rates to keep up with the rising cost of services. The justices agreed to hear an appeal from Idaho, which wants to overturn a lower court decision that ordered the state to increase payments. A 2009 lawsuit argued that the state was unfairly keeping Medicaid reimbursement rates at 2006 levels despite studies showing that the cost of providing care had risen. A federal judge agreed, and the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed."
Justin Sink, The Hill
Fri, 2014-10-03
"The positive effect of ObamaCare on the economy has been "staggering," President Obama argued Thursday during a speech at Northwestern University. "There’s a reason fewer [Republicans] are running against ObamaCare — because while good, affordable healthcare might still be a fanged threat to freedom on Fox News, it’s working pretty well in the real world," the president said. The day after the anniversary of rollout of the Affordable Care Act's exchanges, Obama argued that a "dramatic slowdown in the rising cost of healthcare" had led to more individuals being covered and prices staying lower."

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